BLEPHASTEAM FOR DRY EYES

The Ultimate Warm Compress and Meibomian Gland Massage

What is Blephasteam?

Treatment for Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) uses warm compresses to the eyelids and massaging the

eyelids to melt and express oil that has thickened and blocked the Meibomian gland openings. However this

traditional method is not sufficient to totally melt the hardened meibum. Multiple studies have shown that to

treat MGD, the glands need to be warmed up to a temperature in which the oil secretion blocking the glands

changes from a solid to a liquid state, which is normally just above 40 degrees.

Good thing,
there’s Blephasteam!

Blephasteam is a convenient in-office treatment for Meibomian gland dysfunction. Blephasteam uses the power of moisture and heat to provide a warm chamber with a set temperature that’s very beneficial to the eyes. The combined heat and moisture will increase blood flow and melt the waxy meibum to help relieve dry eyes. After each session, the now-melted secretions are manually expressed, improving oil flow and tear quality. 

Who benefits
from Blephasteam?

Blephasteam works well for most patients. People with Meibomian gland dysfunction and its associated conditions like posterior blepharitis, meibomitis, ocular rosacea, chalazion, contact lens intolerance and dry eyes will benefit from Blephasteam.

Why use Blephasteam?

  • Blephasteam uses latent heat technology and provides the desired heat to melt meibum without any risk to the eyes or eyelids.
  • Blephasteam uses wetted disposable rings into the goggles, which are thrown away after each session, ensuring optimal efficacy and hygiene for your eyes.
  • Blephasteam sessions are just 10 minutes long. For optimum results, we recommend 3 to 4 sessions and then as required.
  • Children can use Blephasteam after consulting with an eye care specialist. They have to be under full supervision during the therapy.
  • Many studies have shown how Blephasteam has helped people with MGD, blepharitis and dry eyes. You can check Blephasteam’s research page here